Zionsville Town Council approves ordinances, park plan amendments

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The Zionsville Town Council held their monthly meeting on 7:00 p.m. on June 4 at Town Hall, 1100 W. Oak St. The next meeting is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on July 2.

What happened: Zionsville resident Kevin Schiferl appeared before the Town Council to remonstrate against last month’s approved rezoning of 15 acres at 8602 E 500 S to accommodate a new headquarters for the Little League International Central Region Headquarters, citing issues with financial transparency and the 76-home Pulte development that is tied to the project.

What this means: Schiferl is representing a group of residents that have been speaking out against this development, specifically because Pulte Homes is planning to purchase the entire parcel, build 76 homes on approximately 40 acres and donate the remaining 15 acres to Little League. The remonstrators have expressed concern about a lack of transparency from both the builders and the town of Zionsville, and disapproval that Pulte has requested a variance to use the Little League land to meet open space requirements for the proposed neighborhood. 15 acres determined for the Little League International headquarters was approved, but the remaining zoning changes have been continued.

“It is my duty as a neighbor, husband, father, citizen and voter to request that this town council do two important things. Number one, adopt a resolution that no public funds from any town-controlled account be allowed to be expended for the Pulte/Little League project without public and transparent procedure in place, with public input allowed,” Schiferl said. “And two, to launch an investigation into how this commitment of public monies to this project came about, without this fiscal body knowing about it. Who made the commitment, whether it is at all documented anywhere, when it was made, and how much is this going tt cost in funds under town control? We’ve heard no numbers, only generalities.”

 

What happened: The council considered on first reading three ordinances establishing three funds that will receive monies from residential developments.

What it means: The council first approved an ordinance (2018-05) establishing the Hampshire Road Fund. The subdivision is required to fund a portion of off-site road improvements. The funds have already been received. The second ordinance, (2018-06), is for money received from Inglenook and Vonterra subdivisions for a water main extension. The third ordinance (2018-07) approved was for the Inglenook Entrance Fund.  Because the Zionsville Road reconstruction project is very close to the construction timing of the Inglenook and the road is going to change alignment drastically, a value was agreed upon for that entrance. The town of Zionsville will construct the entrance to the subdivision with money from Inglenook but as part of the Zionsville Road project.

 

What happened: Amendments were approved to the Zionsville Parks and Recreation 5-Year Park Master Plan, including a three-tier plan that prioritizes Overley-Worman Park trail extensions.

What it means: The Parks and Recreation held three public meetings to survey residents on their park wants and wishes. Eighty-four percent of respondents asked for more land for parks. More than 90 percent indicated that walking facilities were important. This helped guide the Parks and Recreation Department to develop a list of priorities for funding. Priority A involves Overley-Worman park trail extensions to Eagle Creek, a trailhead on Zionsville Road that aims to tie into the Rail Trail and allow easier access to the Monon Trail. The Big 4 Rail Trail extension to Whitestown is also prioritized. All projects will still have to be individually approved.

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