Clenched it or clinched it?

0

I may be the Grammar Guy, but I still learn new things every day. This week’s lesson is brought to you by football.

I’ve written about a pretty varied list of subjects as a journalist: politics, education, crime. I once even did an ill-fated interview with Martin Short. But something I haven’t had much occasion to write about is sports – until recently.

Sports writing has its own lexicon, naturally. I’d give you some examples but, again, it’s sort of outside my ken. Some sports idioms do find life in the general vocabulary – boxing’s “glass jaw” and “down for the count” come to mind. And, some don’t.

Take, for example, the words “clench” and “clinch.” Historically, they are synonyms; both meaning to “hold or fasten tightly.” I’ve even found multiple dictionaries that use one to define the other (which, frankly, is a little lazy on their part).

“Clinch,” though, has evolved a second meaning after adoption by the sports writing community. That meaning is “to make something certain or final” – in particular a win. For example, if the Colts beat the Jaguars on Sunday, they will have “clinched the victory.” While “clench” and “clinch” can typically be used synonymously elsewhere, only “clinch” is appropriate in sports.

I … did not know this.

Fortunately for me, a quick set of edits made everything right in the world again. But, I decided I would be remiss if I didn’t share my edification with you.

Can you think of areas where otherwise synonymous words have industry-specific meanings? If so, drop me a line. And may all of your victories be clinched.


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Share.

Clenched it or clinched it?

0

I may be the Grammar Guy, but I still learn new things every day. This week’s lesson is brought to you by football.

I’ve written about a pretty varied list of subjects as a journalist: politics, education, crime. I once even did an ill-fated interview with Martin Short. But something I haven’t had much occasion to write about is sports – until recently.

Sports writing has its own lexicon, naturally. I’d give you some examples but, again, it’s sort of outside my ken. Some sports idioms do find life in the general vocabulary – boxing’s “glass jaw” and “down for the count” come to mind. And, some don’t.

Take, for example, the words “clench” and “clinch.” Historically, they are synonyms; both meaning to “hold or fasten tightly.” I’ve even found multiple dictionaries that use one to define the other (which, frankly, is a little lazy on their part).

“Clinch,” though, has evolved a second meaning after adoption by the sports writing community. That meaning is “to make something certain or final” – in particular a win. For example, if the Colts beat the Jaguars on Sunday, they will have “clinched the victory.” While “clench” and “clinch” can typically be used synonymously elsewhere, only “clinch” is appropriate in sports.

I … did not know this.

Fortunately for me, a quick set of edits made everything right in the world again. But, I decided I would be remiss if I didn’t share my edification with you.

Can you think of areas where otherwise synonymous words have industry-specific meanings? If so, drop me a line. And may all of your victories be clinched.


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Clenched it or clinched it?

0

I may be the Grammar Guy, but I still learn new things every day. This week’s lesson is brought to you by football.

I’ve written about a pretty varied list of subjects as a journalist: politics, education, crime. I once even did an ill-fated interview with Martin Short. But something I haven’t had much occasion to write about is sports – until recently.

Sports writing has its own lexicon, naturally. I’d give you some examples but, again, it’s sort of outside my ken. Some sports idioms do find life in the general vocabulary – boxing’s “glass jaw” and “down for the count” come to mind. And, some don’t.

Take, for example, the words “clench” and “clinch.” Historically, they are synonyms; both meaning to “hold or fasten tightly.” I’ve even found multiple dictionaries that use one to define the other (which, frankly, is a little lazy on their part).

“Clinch,” though, has evolved a second meaning after adoption by the sports writing community. That meaning is “to make something certain or final” – in particular a win. For example, if the Colts beat the Jaguars on Sunday, they will have “clinched the victory.” While “clench” and “clinch” can typically be used synonymously elsewhere, only “clinch” is appropriate in sports.

I … did not know this.

Fortunately for me, a quick set of edits made everything right in the world again. But, I decided I would be remiss if I didn’t share my edification with you.

Can you think of areas where otherwise synonymous words have industry-specific meanings? If so, drop me a line. And may all of your victories be clinched.


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Clenched it or clinched it?

0

I may be the Grammar Guy, but I still learn new things every day. This week’s lesson is brought to you by football.

I’ve written about a pretty varied list of subjects as a journalist: politics, education, crime. I once even did an ill-fated interview with Martin Short. But something I haven’t had much occasion to write about is sports – until recently.

Sports writing has its own lexicon, naturally. I’d give you some examples but, again, it’s sort of outside my ken. Some sports idioms do find life in the general vocabulary – boxing’s “glass jaw” and “down for the count” come to mind. And, some don’t.

Take, for example, the words “clench” and “clinch.” Historically, they are synonyms; both meaning to “hold or fasten tightly.” I’ve even found multiple dictionaries that use one to define the other (which, frankly, is a little lazy on their part).

“Clinch,” though, has evolved a second meaning after adoption by the sports writing community. That meaning is “to make something certain or final” – in particular a win. For example, if the Colts beat the Jaguars on Sunday, they will have “clinched the victory.” While “clench” and “clinch” can typically be used synonymously elsewhere, only “clinch” is appropriate in sports.

I … did not know this.

Fortunately for me, a quick set of edits made everything right in the world again. But, I decided I would be remiss if I didn’t share my edification with you.

Can you think of areas where otherwise synonymous words have industry-specific meanings? If so, drop me a line. And may all of your victories be clinched.


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Clenched it or clinched it?

0

I may be the Grammar Guy, but I still learn new things every day. This week’s lesson is brought to you by football.

I’ve written about a pretty varied list of subjects as a journalist: politics, education, crime. I once even did an ill-fated interview with Martin Short. But something I haven’t had much occasion to write about is sports – until recently.

Sports writing has its own lexicon, naturally. I’d give you some examples but, again, it’s sort of outside my ken. Some sports idioms do find life in the general vocabulary – boxing’s “glass jaw” and “down for the count” come to mind. And, some don’t.

Take, for example, the words “clench” and “clinch.” Historically, they are synonyms; both meaning to “hold or fasten tightly.” I’ve even found multiple dictionaries that use one to define the other (which, frankly, is a little lazy on their part).

“Clinch,” though, has evolved a second meaning after adoption by the sports writing community. That meaning is “to make something certain or final” – in particular a win. For example, if the Colts beat the Jaguars on Sunday, they will have “clinched the victory.” While “clench” and “clinch” can typically be used synonymously elsewhere, only “clinch” is appropriate in sports.

I … did not know this.

Fortunately for me, a quick set of edits made everything right in the world again. But, I decided I would be remiss if I didn’t share my edification with you.

Can you think of areas where otherwise synonymous words have industry-specific meanings? If so, drop me a line. And may all of your victories be clinched.


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.