Fishers resident appears on ‘Price is Right; gameshow

0
Lisa and Robin Peters kept their promise to their son, Trevor (center) that they made when he was a child. Trevor Peters became a contestant on “The Price is Right” after watching since 1995. (Submitted photo)

Lisa and Robin Peters kept their promise to their son, Trevor (center) that they made when he was a child. Trevor Peters became a contestant on “The Price is Right” after watching since 1995. (Submitted photo)

By Holly Demaree

As a child Trevor Peters grew up watching the “The Price is Right” and dreaming that one day he would be on the show. His parents promised him one day they would make a trip to Los Angeles and get on the show. Well the dream became a reality when Peters not only got tickets to be on the show but was also called down to be a contestant.

“I’ve dreamed of being on the show since I was a kid,” Peters said. “Every time I was home sick from school I watched it at 11 a.m. My parents promised they would take me.”

Peters and his family traveled to L.A. this summer just for the show. Tickets were purchased three months in advance; they arrived at the studio five hours before the taping of the show and waited in line to be interviewed by a producer to become a contestant.

“We were the first ones in line and we had to fill out a bunch of paperwork,” Peters said. “The studio holds 350 people and the producer interviews all 350 people and you have about a 15-second pitch you give about yourself to make them notice you.”

Only nine of the 350 people are chosen to be a contestant. Contestants participate in the different games that are created for the show. Peters made sure to make an impression and he was chosen to be a contestant. He did not know it though until the taping began.

“The show started and I saw them put a camera in my face but I didn’t really process anything,” said Peters. “It was so loud in there. I couldn’t really hear what the announcer was saying but they held a poster up with my name written on it. I was the very first one to be called down at the beginning of the show.”

On the first bid Peters overbid and did not play the first game but on the second bid he did. He bid $735 for a bicycle and the price was $755.

“I was just going crazy.  It was a dream come true,” said Peters. “I shook Drew Carey’s hand and then the announcer opened the door and it was a new Volkswagen. I ended up losing the car by bidding $1,000 dollars short but I did win the bike. I didn’t win the car but it was still a dream come true.”

Share.

Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact