Bizarre foods: Tangelos

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The tangelo resembles a clementine in appearance, but it is sweeter and juicier. (Photo by Anna Skinner)

The tangelo resembles a clementine in appearance, but it is sweeter and juicier. (Photo by Anna Skinner)

Commentary by Anna Skinner

What is it?

Tangelos, appearance wise, look like a mix between a clementine and a deformed orange. Although oranges and clementines have nothing to do with the hybrid fruit, the exterior is orange and fits in the palm of your hand, and has a small knob on the top. Tangelos are a mix between a pomelo – also known as a grapefruit – and a tangerine. According to purdue.edu, the first cross between the two fruits was made in 1897.

How to eat it:

Similar to a clementine or orange, the tangelo must be peeled before consumption. Personally, I thought the fruit was easier to peel than others in the citrus family because of the deformed-looking knob at the top of the fruit. I grasped the knob and peeled the flesh to reveal the juicy fruit.

What does it taste like?

Depending on ripeness, the tangelo can taste sour like a grapefruit or sweet like a tangerine. The riper ones are sweeter, and I thought they were juicier than a clementine.

Where to buy:

Tangelos aren’t too foreign, and are often available at many local grocers. I purchased mine at Westfield’s relatively new Fresh Thyme, 3400 E 146th St., for a discounted price of 88 cents per pound. What a deal! The fruit was gone in less than a week, and I have kept my eyes open for more sales.


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