CHS boys choir rallies to continue

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By Brandie Bohney
editorial@youarecurrent.com

Greyhound Sound is the Carmel High School boys choir. Director Lamonte Kuskye has always made the extracurricular club available during first semester to any boys interested in singing. But with Kuskye’s busy second-semester schedule – including the spring musical and show choir competition season – Greyhound Sound has never been able to continue beyond January.

That changed this year.

Recently, a motivated group of more than 30 young men refused to let Greyhound Sound diebefore the second semester.  Instead, they worked with Kuskye to develop the group as a student-led choir, rather than a faculty-led club.  Kuskye said while there is always a staff member in the room with the boys, no one on staff selects music, accompanies or directs the students involved.  The members of Greyhound Sound now accomplish all of those tasks themselves with a student director and several club officers.

“There’s a really cool enthusiasm; the guys are really into it,” Kuskye said with a grin. “That’s why I hated to completely dissolve it.”

The boys have their own goals for the club.

“We’re trying to get as many men into singing as possible,” junior Chris Jamerson said.“It’s really a great opportunity for them to be able to show up here … because this is really just like a glee club. We have a lot of fun here, and it’s a lot less pressure.”

Several boys mentioned Greyhound Sound serves as a springboard into academic choirs, and it gives an opportunity for students who don’t have time in their schedule for a choir to participate in one.

Junior Mark SanGiorgio said that not being in an academic choir has its perks, too.

“It also gives us more freedom to choose what we want to do … instead of whatever (a director) would want us to do,” he said.

“We can do more songs we can have fun with,” sophomore Nick Navarro added.

The club has given the boys an opportunity to continue singing as a group and further strengthen their friendships, as senior John Evelo explained.

“It’s not all about sequined vests and putting jazz hands out there on stage,” he said.“It’s a place where you can build a sort of brotherhood.”

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