Problem solving might be at root of frustration

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You ever feel frustrated with someone you personally like? We all do sometimes. Everyone gets frustrated and annoyed by people they really enjoy. How you approach a problem, your fundamental instincts in problem solving, might just be at the root of it. We all solve problems differently. How you solve a problem is less about your personality as it is your own personal process for problem solving. Someone kicks sand in your face, some of us would shove the offender down immediately while others would ask, “Why’d you do that?” and evaluate the answer before taking any action.

When solving problems, there are people that need research, facts and additional information before they will do anything. Others will act without any answers. Some need to build things or dive right in and get their hands dirty while others need to follow a mapped out process. Everyone has a unique path and work and home frustrations can rise when people don’t appreciate your unique path.

If you need data before making a decision, you’ll frustrate a person who prefers to jump to action and figure out the facts on the fly. You could be great friends but become quickly annoyed if you work jointly on problems. We all have a natural tendency to think everyone is wired just like us and that our way is the only way. Truth is, there are a lot of ways to do things and none more inherently correct than the others.

Two children from the same house, the same parents, the same opportunities and insights more often than not are fundamentally different. Those two children might both approach a problem in different ways but reach a similar successful outcome. You have to appreciate and understand that everyone has a different approach to solving a problem. Everyone has differing needs. Everyone is not the same when solving a problem. That means you have to communicate to people in a way that meets their needs, not yours. And, as my youngest daughter likes to say about things she agrees with, “I think Blake would turn around for that.”

David Cain works at Magnitude, a sales and marketing agency. Contact David at David.Cain@MarketMagnitude.com.

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Problem solving might be at root of frustration

0

You ever feel frustrated with someone you personally like? We all do sometimes. Everyone gets frustrated and annoyed by people they really enjoy. How you approach a problem, your fundamental instincts in problem solving, might just be at the root of it. We all solve problems differently. How you solve a problem is less about your personality as it is your own personal process for problem solving. Someone kicks sand in your face, some of us would shove the offender down immediately while others would ask, “Why’d you do that?” and evaluate the answer before taking any action.

When solving problems, there are people that need research, facts and additional information before they will do anything. Others will act without any answers. Some need to build things or dive right in and get their hands dirty while others need to follow a mapped out process. Everyone has a unique path and work and home frustrations can rise when people don’t appreciate your unique path.

If you need data before making a decision, you’ll frustrate a person who prefers to jump to action and figure out the facts on the fly. You could be great friends but become quickly annoyed if you work jointly on problems. We all have a natural tendency to think everyone is wired just like us and that our way is the only way. Truth is, there are a lot of ways to do things and none more inherently correct than the others.

Two children from the same house, the same parents, the same opportunities and insights more often than not are fundamentally different. Those two children might both approach a problem in different ways but reach a similar successful outcome. You have to appreciate and understand that everyone has a different approach to solving a problem. Everyone has differing needs. Everyone is not the same when solving a problem. That means you have to communicate to people in a way that meets their needs, not yours. And, as my youngest daughter likes to say about things she agrees with, “I think Blake would turn around for that.”

David Cain works at Magnitude, a sales and marketing agency. Contact David at David.Cain@MarketMagnitude.com.

Share.

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This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.