Airtron

The decay of perfection

0

The other day we were sitting together as a family, and my younger two kids were talking about how great Dad is. My oldest said something like this, “Dad isn’t great, I heard him say a bad word.” Well, there it was, that moment when I realized I wasn’t “the best” anymore to my son. Honestly, I don’t remember what I said or when I said it. Don’t worry, it probably wasn’t that bad of a word. I thought about defending myself, asking what it was specifically so I could tell him that it isn’t a great word, but it really isn’t a “bad” word.

Instead of trying to prove my perfection, I sat him down and admitted my faults. I told him he was right, I’m not perfect, and I do make mistakes. I asked for his forgiveness and told him I also want to show him how to respond when he makes mistakes. Even in my failures I can demonstrate right actions.

The guidelines for life in the Bible are clear, yet no one is perfect, so I guess a great parent should not only strive to do right, but strive also to demonstrate how to make corrections when the mistakes inevitably come.

“For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.” (Romans 3:23-24 ESV)

Somewhere in the intersection of perfection and humble correction, I can demonstrate what it means to be a Godly parent.

So as my children, one by one, realize my faults and my weaknesses, they will realize I am not the strongest dad, nor the smartest, honestly I am not even sure I am a good dad sometimes! So as they grow and their perception of my life puts me smack dab in the middle of mediocre, I pray they will see what a great dad should look like – someone who is willing to be corrected. So what will you do?

I challenge you not to perfection, but to make mid-stream corrections and teach them how to do the same. Say sorry, admit when you’re wrong, ask for forgiveness, man up and show your kids how they truly should walk through life.

Now that’s a good dad.

Acts 2:38, “And Peter said to them, ‘Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.’”


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Share.

The decay of perfection

0

The other day we were sitting together as a family, and my younger two kids were talking about how great Dad is. My oldest said something like this, “Dad isn’t great, I heard him say a bad word.” Well, there it was, that moment when I realized I wasn’t “the best” anymore to my son. Honestly, I don’t remember what I said or when I said it. Don’t worry, it probably wasn’t that bad of a word. I thought about defending myself, asking what it was specifically so I could tell him that it isn’t a great word, but it really isn’t a “bad” word.

Instead of trying to prove my perfection, I sat him down and admitted my faults. I told him he was right, I’m not perfect, and I do make mistakes. I asked for his forgiveness and told him I also want to show him how to respond when he makes mistakes. Even in my failures I can demonstrate right actions.

The guidelines for life in the Bible are clear, yet no one is perfect, so I guess a great parent should not only strive to do right, but strive also to demonstrate how to make corrections when the mistakes inevitably come.

“For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.” (Romans 3:23-24 ESV)

Somewhere in the intersection of perfection and humble correction, I can demonstrate what it means to be a Godly parent.

So as my children, one by one, realize my faults and my weaknesses, they will realize I am not the strongest dad, nor the smartest, honestly I am not even sure I am a good dad sometimes! So as they grow and their perception of my life puts me smack dab in the middle of mediocre, I pray they will see what a great dad should look like – someone who is willing to be corrected. So what will you do?

I challenge you not to perfection, but to make mid-stream corrections and teach them how to do the same. Say sorry, admit when you’re wrong, ask for forgiveness, man up and show your kids how they truly should walk through life.

Now that’s a good dad.

Acts 2:38, “And Peter said to them, ‘Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.’”


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
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