Zionsville Town Council denies zoning ordinance, hears first vote on ARPA funds

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The Zionsville Town Council met March 7 for a final vote on an ordinance to establish an equitable impact fee for the purpose of planning and financing Zionsville Parks and Recreation infrastructure and voted on other agenda items.

What happened: The council voted 6-0 in favor of a final ordinance to establish an equitable impact fee for the purpose of planning and financing Zionsville Parks and Recreation infrastructure to serve new developments in the town.

What it means: Any new home constructed in Zionsville will bring in a one-time fee to be paid to the parks department for future development. The fee will be $2,045 for detached and attached single-family homes and $941 for multi-family homes.

 

What happened: After a tie vote at the Feb. 7 meeting, the council reheard a proposed ordinance to amend the town’s zoning classification for the plot of land at 5929 S. 700 E. The proposal was to change the zoning from Rural Single Family Residential to Rural Single Family and Two-Family Residential for the future purpose of donating the land to Habitat for Humanity.

The proposal was denied by a 4-2 vote.

What it means: Because the proposal was denied, it cannot be revisited for a year. However, a waiver can be requested from the Plan Commission if a party can demonstrate that a substantial change has been made since the denial.

 

What happened: The council voted on appointments for the People of Zionsville for the Aesthetics of Zionsville Committee.

What it means: Pauline Coderre, Michal Owens, Andrew Schnell and Dillon Wyatt were appointed to the committee on one-year terms.

 

What happened: The council conducted a first vote on how to spend the first round of the town’s allotment of American Rescue Plan Act funds. The ordinance passed 6-0.

What it means: The town has been allocated $6,402,231.80 in ARPA funds, of which it has received $3,201,115.90 as of March 7. The council voted to allow a one-time payment of up to $5,000 to eligible public safety workers, such as firefighters and police officers, with eligible part-time firefighters able to receive up to $1,500. The cost is estimated to be $623,162.

What’s next: The council will have a second vote on the ordinance at its March 21 meeting.

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